Korean Roast Lamb Shoulder

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It’s a Sunday, Autumn has hit with a thump and the clocks have changed – damn you time, it will be dark at 4.30 soon!  It is a season that once it gets going I absolutely adore though, the colours fill me with joy, the 5 squirrels in our garden are taking great pleasure in being trained by the kids.  I call it training very loosely you understand.  It involves long lines of string (we haven’t got any rope handy), these are connected from fences to posts with food on top of them.  None of the children have seen these acrobatics from the squirrels but each time they look the food has disappeared.  They are convinced it’s the squirrels and however many times I say to them it’s probably birds they just look at me and roll their eyes, I mean how could it possibly be?  Fair enough, it keeps them quiet. The only down side to the ‘training’ is that every night I go to shut the chickens in and it feels like I’m in Mission Impossible, I can see the local headline ‘Woman found garrotted by string in garden whilst shutting chickens away for the night’.  What a dull exit from this world, let’s hope they get bored before that happens!

And so to the Korean Roast Lamb, this is a Gizzi Erskine dish from her book ‘Skinny Weeks Weekend Feast’ Book.  I don’t own this book but got this recipe last winter time in a Sunday supplement and as the nights start to draw in and the evenings are cool enough for you to want to light the fire it is a lovely dish.  It’s only now that I’m blogging it I have actually read the text accompanying it to find that this is in her book so I’m definitely off to have a look at the rest of the recipes – I am generally not into buying calorie counting books but fingers crossed they are not the same regurgitated recipes as are in most books – I will report back but am sure that based on her previous recipes they will be inventive and a bit different and hope I can easily work out the syn value for Slimming World.

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Korean Roast Lamb Shoulder – serves 8 – 8.5 syns per serving

  • 6 garlic cloves, grated
  • 4 spring onions, finely chopped
  • Thumb size piece of ginger, grated
  • 3 tbsp sesame oil
  • 4 tbsp  white miso paste
  • 2 tbsp gochujang (this is a hot pepper paste which we substitute with Chu Hou Sauce which is mainly soybeans, ginger and garlic when the children are sharing this)
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp mirin
  • 1 x 1 1/2 kg lamb shoulder
  • Seasoning

Mix together garlic, spring onions, ginger, sesame oil, miso, gochujang or Chu Hou sauce, soy sauce and mirin.

Season lamb and smother with the marinade and leave for 2 hours.

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Heat oven to 200 degrees C.  Gizzi now browns the lamb on all sides with veg oil, I didn’t do this and put it directly into the oven without browning but do whichever you like but remember to syn the veg oil if you do brown it off.  Put in oven for 30 minutes.

Lower temperature to 170 degrees C and roast for another 3 hours or until the lamb is falling off the bone – this gives you time for a lovely walk while it’s in the oven, or a trip to the pub which is more likely in my house.

Leave the lamb to rest and then slice and pull apart with forks.  Gizzi then serves this in lettuce leaves which is great for Slimming World but my kids demand pancakes so that’s what the picture is of (again, if you use the pancakes (1.5 syns each) and hoisin sauce (2 syns per level tbsp) – syn them).

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I serve this with spring onions and cucumber in the lettuce leaves and a steaming bowl of rice and stir fry noodles with vegetables.

 

Twisted Kedgeree

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What a whole bunch of faffing around – I have had issues with positing these photos as there was a WordPress something or other technical going on.  Consequently I kept abandoning this post, huffing, laptop being unceremoniously abandoned on a sofa or coffee table.  Every time I looked at it it was calling me ‘finish this post’ go on, do it’, to no avail.  In the end I had to resort to getting my ‘expert’ to sort it out, so thanks Mr K.

So to my Kedgeree, I would eat it morning, noon and night if I could but the only issue I have ever had is that you can’t really reheat it as the rice dries out a bit too much for me.  And knowing that I can only cook for about a dozen this doesn’t really work in my world.

I thought everyone knew how to make kedgeree but apparently not, several people have asked me what it is when I’m discussing my boring breakfast.  I do love breakfast but my issue is that I just don’t have time and my waistline can’t stand what I actually want,  fresh, hot buttered toast or a lovely bacon sandwich, but alas, normally fruit and yoghurt washed down with plenty of coffee is as exciting as it gets.  I realised after the word kedgeree came up for about the tenth time it could no longer be ignored and I would just have it for dinner instead.  Kedgeree is an Anglo-Indian mash up and the smoked haddock and eggs were added when it was brought over in Colonial times.  I thought why not make a kedgeree with risotto rice instead of plain boiled rice.  After having a look around there are others who do this too so here is such a beautiful dish that you can have at any time of day, I made enough that I got to reheat it for breakfast which is when it is traditionally eaten and it didn’t dry out at all.

I do have to say that I put a little too much fennel in it though so make sure you put the amount I list below and not the quantity I have put in the picture, oops!  And another thing, I can only apologise for the fact that the haddock is dyed – it drives me mad when I can’t find natural dyed smoked haddock but unfortunately the people of the UK apparently still demand this so it’s what there was I’m afraid.

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Twisted Kedgeree – Serves as many as you like – syn free on Slimming World

  • Smoked Haddock
  • 1 large shallot, chopped
  • Risotto rice
  • Fish stock
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds
  • 1/4 tsp chilli powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1 lemon
  • Parsley
  • 3 eggs, hard boiled

Dry fry cumin and fennel seeds until they release their scent, then add turmeric, chilli powder and salt, then grind in pestle and mortar.

Fry off shallot in fry light, add risotto rice and ground spices and gradually add hot stock until all absorbed (follow general instructions here on cooking risotto)

Whilst cooking risotto, boil eggs for 7 minutes, peel and cut into quarters when slightly cooled.

Remove skin, cut fish into pieces and add this to risotto rice about 5 minutes before risotto is cooked.

When risotto and haddock is cooked add the garam masala, eggs and lemon juice to taste and a little extra stock if you need to loosen it up.

Add parsley, stir through and serve as much as you like.

Reheat the next morning for breakfast.

Arancini the Healthy Way

DSC_0079This is one of my all time favourite Friday night dishes.  My K often makes himself a pizza on a Friday so this is the perfect recipe to use up his leftover tomato sauce.  You do have to be a little organised as I always use leftover risotto from the night before too.  To be honest, it’s not really leftover, I’m just greedy so always make way too much but what a perfect way to use it up rather than just re-heating. And as is my normal gluttonous style I also make too many of these, but again that’s perfect.  I am very well known for opening a fridge door and standing and eating things whilst deciding what it is I really want, so to have these in the fridge over the weekend is a life-saver.

I do have an admission with these – as I made the tomato sauce from scratch instead of using Mr K’s, and as Mr K had not arrived back from work with basil I added a bit of bbq spice to the sauce instead of basil – not sure why on earth I would think that an appropriate substitute, but it was rather nice.  I have to say that if Mr K reads this he will say ‘I don’t make my pizza sauce base like that’ whilst looking at me accusingly, so there’s my admission.

The reason these are healthy is purely because I use wholemeal breadcrumbs and they are cooked in the oven.  Technically these should be deep fried so if that’s your bag then go for it, but if you follow Slimming World or are healthy eating then give these a go.

And WOW, 2 blog posts already this week.  Sometimes I can be organised!

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Arancini the Healthy Way – serves as many as you fancy – syns 0 (make sure you syn this if you are not using bread and parmesan as HEX A & B)

  • Leftover risotto – see ‘Singing Aida‘ for a great basic risotto

For tomato sauce:

  • 1 garlic clove, chopped
  • 1 tsp garlic salt
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp sweetener
  • 1 tsp bbq spice mix (optional)
  • 1 can tomatoes, or bottle passata
  • Wholemeal breadcrumbs, blitzed in food processor until fine
  • 2 Eggs

Throw all of the tomato sauce ingredients into a pan and simmer for about 10 minutes until reduced, thickened and everything has cooked through.

Beat the eggs in a bowl

Put breadcrumbs in bowl

Make the chilled risotto into balls (about golf ball size)

Roll these in the eggs, then the breadcrumbs, put on baking parchment, spray with frylight and cook in a 180 degree C oven for about 20-30 minutes or until lovely and brown, turning if necessary.

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Serve with rocket and some of the sauce and a sprig of basil on the top (see, the basil did eventually arrive) and a lovely glass of red wine.

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A Trip Along the Grand Trunk Road – Part 3 Aloo Dimer Jhol

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This is the final part of this curry feast and I hope you agree that all of the dishes can stand up to being served either on their own or as part of a varied feast. I was somewhat outside of my comfort zone with this one, although I love eggs I have never used them as the main ingredient in a curry but I think it was a triumph and would urge you to give this one a go.

I yet again have to apologise for the presentation and photography – late Saturday night and I might have had a glass of wine which means I become a little less careful (in fact, it sort of gets thrown at the table at that stage) ‘hangs head in shame’.

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Aloo Dimer Jhol – serves 2 – syn free

  • 4 small potatoes
  • 4 hard boiled eggs
  • 1 large garlic clove
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3 tomatoes, roughly chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 cardamom pods
  • 2 cloves
  • 1 inch piece ginger
  • 1 large green chilli
  • 1/2 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp chilli powder
  • salt
  • 1 tbsp fresh coriander

Slice potatoes lengthways.  Spray pan with frylight and shallow fry potatoes over a low heat until cooked through.  Set these aside and fry eggs, whole, for 2-3 minutes and set aside.

Put garlic, chopped onions and tomatoes in blender and puree.  Set aside.

To the empty pan add bay leaf, cinnamon stick, cardamom pods and cloves and cook for a couple of minutes.  Add the tomato and onion puree, cover and cook on a medium heat for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add the turmeric, cumin, chilli powder and salt.  Add 250ml water and simmer for about another 10 minutes until this has thickened.  Add the potatoes and eggs and cook for a further 5 minutes.  Serve sprinkled with fresh chopped coriander.

 

A Trip Along the Grand Trunk Road – Part 2 Rogan Josh

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I must start with an apology for not posting sooner. I was full of intentions to post this a couple of days after the Poussin Penda recipe but school holidays took over and too much fun was being had. Now we are back to the chaos that is school, swimming, Beavers, Scouts and, oh yes work, I feel everything is slotting back into place – I still don’t like sending them back to school though, it’s amazing how I don’t shout for 6 weeks and the first day back I am already bored of hearing the words ‘brush you hair, have you done your teeth, put your shoes on and STOP PLAYING THE PIANO!’. So here is the very very late posting of the Rogan Josh recipe.

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Rogan Josh – serves 4 – syn free

  • 1 kg lean boneless lamb, cut into chunks
  • 4 green cardamom pods
  • 4 cloves
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 2 tbsp ginger and garlic paste (two thirds garlic, one third ginger blended with water to make smooth paste)
  • 2 tsp chilli powder
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 4 tomatoes, pureed
  • 100g fat free natural yogurt
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp garam masala

Spray fry light in a pan and add the whole spices, leave over gentle heat for a few minutes, making sure they don’t catch on the bottom of the pan as you are not using oil.

Add onions and cook until golden brown, then add the lamb and cook over a high heat until seared. Add the ginger and garlic paste and cook for a couple of minutes. Stir in about 500 mls water and simmer gently for 30 minutes, add more water if necessary. stir in ground spices and cook for another 15 minutes.

Add pureed tomatoes and yogurt and cook for additional 15 minutes or until lamb is tender. Season and sprinkle with garam masala and a few coriander sprigs and serve.

A Trip Along the Grand Trunk Road – Part 1 Poussin Penda

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Most of you already know of my love for Indian food (see previous posts here and here).  Any sort at all, from the mildest korma to the more unusual dishes.  I was browsing a charity shop a couple of weeks ago when Big Miss K asked if I had seen this cookery book – she knows where my heart lies you see.  Anyway, it turns out they were selling a whole load of them for 50p each.  Now, I’m still very particular about cookery books in my house and this was the only one I bought from that pile thank goodness, otherwise we may have to get more bookcases.  And I am so pleased I did.  It’s called ‘Food of the Grand Trunk Road’ and must have been a gift for someone originally because it just hasn’t been used – the pages have hardly been turned let alone ending up like most of my spattered books.  These dishes are more unusual, how often do you think about buying a book and then realise you have 10 all which have the same recipes in them already – this is certainly not one of those books.

It took me some time to decide what I was going to make.  Eventually the decision was made, A Rogan Josh (Mr K asked for something spicy), a Poussin Penda and more unsually, and because I currently have a glut of eggs, Aloo Dimer Jhol, an egg curry with potatoes.  I have to say, I have never used eggs in a curry and did follow the recipe to the letter as I was concerned the eggs would fall apart and it would all turn to mush but no, it was amazing.  In fact all of them were delicious.  Mr K loves Indian food but I can have a slightly heavy hand when tipping chillies into a dish, and occasionally he has a look of fear once the heats comes through, only occasionally you understand.  He tells me that although these were hot, they were not ‘blow you head off’ hot, which is a compliment, honestly.  The heat dissipated quickly and you were just left with the full flavour.  I did tell him to drink a Lassi with it but he looked oddly at me and said he would be just fine with beer.  I can only apologise for the photos – by the time I took this it was quite late and we were very hungry – oh, and I might have had a couple of glasses of wine ;-)

So the first dish I will tell you about is the Poussin Penda – I will post the others over the next couple of days and hopefully in time for you to give them all a go for an Indian Feast at the weekend.

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Poussin Penda – serves 4 as part of meal – syns per serving 0 (syn if you eat the skin though)

  • 1 Poussin, cut into 4 pieces
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 5 tomatoes, pureed
  • 1 1/2 tsp chilli powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1 tsp salt

Heat pan and spray with some frylight, add the onion, garlic and cinnamon and cook until the onion is browned.

Add Poussin pieces and fry until skin is lightly browned, then add pureed tomatoes, chilli powder, coriander, turmeric, cumin, garam masala and salt and mix well.

Stir in 1 litre of water, cover and cook poussin on medium heat for about 20 minutes.

After this time, check chicken is cooked through and remove from the sauce, check if sauce is thick enough, if not, reduce down until it is the required consistency, if too thick, add some more water – this is personal taste.  It is THAT easy!

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Moroccan Jewelled Delight

 

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One of the things I love is picking veggies from our veg plot.  It seems sometimes that is the only place I can get peace and quiet.  I used to put music on and weed, dig and plant but now I relish the solitude and listening to the birds and the wind through the trees.  Only the occasional offering of polite greeting to an allotment neighbour disturbs my peace, or the occasional advice request (me doing the asking I hasten to add, I’m not naturally green fingered).  Quite proud this year of the fact that we have 2 rows of fennel happily growing which I have never grown before.

My plot is certainly by no means a thing of beauty but I can take the children down and they absolutely love digging up potatoes or picking beans or courgettes, getting a little conveyor belt going, big Miss K digs, little Miss K grabs the potatoes and Middle Miss K gets to count them into the trug.  All of this said, one of the best veg is rainbow chard, and luckily you plant it, it grows, as long as it has enough water and sun, it just grows, no fussing over it, no picking out smaller plants, and look how pretty it is, it looks like jewels glinting in the sunlight.

This dish was inspired both by the butternut squash, which seems to have been frequently used in the last week in my house as I made Curried Squash soup with lentils and then another squash appeared and I just thought the colour, along with the chard was a thing of beauty.  Chard has such a lovely earthy quality that it really suits being served with the sweetness of the squash.

I don’t often use pastry nowadays as I adore it and if it is in front of me, I would generally eat too much of it, but 3 of these little beauties are made out of one filo pastry sheet and you spray with frylight so you can really control your syns if you follow Slimming World.  I did try making one by rolling a whole sheet around the cooled mix like a sausage roll and then winding it round like a snail but it did not look particularly pleasant and was rather unwieldy but give it a try if you have more patience that I.

The only other thing to remember is to make sure is that everything is about the same size dice, remember, these are delicate things and not like a whacking great big pie.

 

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Moroccan Inspired Filo Tartlets – Serves 6 – syns per 3 tartlets – 6

  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 butternut squash, diced
  • 1 can chickpeas, drained
  • rainbow chard or spinach, chopped
  • 1 tbsp ras el hanout
  • 1 tbsp cumin powder
  • 1 tsp ginger powder
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 0% greek yogurt
  • handful fresh mint leaves
  • 1 pack Just-roll filo pastry (just remember to check syns depending on type of filo used)

Fry off onions and garlic in fry light until softened

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Add butternut squash, then all of the spices and stir to coat, adding seasoning

 

Add enough water to cook the squash, which will take about 15 minutes with the lid on, but not so much that the mixture is wet at the end, no running sauce in this dish

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At this stage you can either keep this warm while you cook your filo or you can leave it to cool and reheat later

Spray a muffin tin well with frylight

DSC_0064Lay 1 sheet filo on a board, spray liberally with frylight and then cut into 3 squares and place them as you wish in the muffin tin

Place these into a 180 degree C oven for about 5 minutes or until lightly browned

Remove from oven and put warmed mixture into the tarlets

Serve with 0% Greek Yogurt mixed with seasoning and chopped mint and a green salad