A Trip Along the Grand Trunk Road – Part 3 Aloo Dimer Jhol

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This is the final part of this curry feast and I hope you agree that all of the dishes can stand up to being served either on their own or as part of a varied feast. I was somewhat outside of my comfort zone with this one, although I love eggs I have never used them as the main ingredient in a curry but I think it was a triumph and would urge you to give this one a go.

I yet again have to apologise for the presentation and photography – late Saturday night and I might have had a glass of wine which means I become a little less careful (in fact, it sort of gets thrown at the table at that stage) ‘hangs head in shame’.

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Aloo Dimer Jhol – serves 2 – syn free

  • 4 small potatoes
  • 4 hard boiled eggs
  • 1 large garlic clove
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3 tomatoes, roughly chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 cardamom pods
  • 2 cloves
  • 1 inch piece ginger
  • 1 large green chilli
  • 1/2 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp chilli powder
  • salt
  • 1 tbsp fresh coriander

Slice potatoes lengthways.  Spray pan with frylight and shallow fry potatoes over a low heat until cooked through.  Set these aside and fry eggs, whole, for 2-3 minutes and set aside.

Put garlic, chopped onions and tomatoes in blender and puree.  Set aside.

To the empty pan add bay leaf, cinnamon stick, cardamom pods and cloves and cook for a couple of minutes.  Add the tomato and onion puree, cover and cook on a medium heat for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add the turmeric, cumin, chilli powder and salt.  Add 250ml water and simmer for about another 10 minutes until this has thickened.  Add the potatoes and eggs and cook for a further 5 minutes.  Serve sprinkled with fresh chopped coriander.

 

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A Trip Along the Grand Trunk Road – Part 2 Rogan Josh

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I must start with an apology for not posting sooner. I was full of intentions to post this a couple of days after the Poussin Penda recipe but school holidays took over and too much fun was being had. Now we are back to the chaos that is school, swimming, Beavers, Scouts and, oh yes work, I feel everything is slotting back into place – I still don’t like sending them back to school though, it’s amazing how I don’t shout for 6 weeks and the first day back I am already bored of hearing the words ‘brush you hair, have you done your teeth, put your shoes on and STOP PLAYING THE PIANO!’. So here is the very very late posting of the Rogan Josh recipe.

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Rogan Josh – serves 4 – syn free

  • 1 kg lean boneless lamb, cut into chunks
  • 4 green cardamom pods
  • 4 cloves
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 2 tbsp ginger and garlic paste (two thirds garlic, one third ginger blended with water to make smooth paste)
  • 2 tsp chilli powder
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 4 tomatoes, pureed
  • 100g fat free natural yogurt
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp garam masala

Spray fry light in a pan and add the whole spices, leave over gentle heat for a few minutes, making sure they don’t catch on the bottom of the pan as you are not using oil.

Add onions and cook until golden brown, then add the lamb and cook over a high heat until seared. Add the ginger and garlic paste and cook for a couple of minutes. Stir in about 500 mls water and simmer gently for 30 minutes, add more water if necessary. stir in ground spices and cook for another 15 minutes.

Add pureed tomatoes and yogurt and cook for additional 15 minutes or until lamb is tender. Season and sprinkle with garam masala and a few coriander sprigs and serve.

A Trip Along the Grand Trunk Road – Part 1 Poussin Penda

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Most of you already know of my love for Indian food (see previous posts here and here).  Any sort at all, from the mildest korma to the more unusual dishes.  I was browsing a charity shop a couple of weeks ago when Big Miss K asked if I had seen this cookery book – she knows where my heart lies you see.  Anyway, it turns out they were selling a whole load of them for 50p each.  Now, I’m still very particular about cookery books in my house and this was the only one I bought from that pile thank goodness, otherwise we may have to get more bookcases.  And I am so pleased I did.  It’s called ‘Food of the Grand Trunk Road’ and must have been a gift for someone originally because it just hasn’t been used – the pages have hardly been turned let alone ending up like most of my spattered books.  These dishes are more unusual, how often do you think about buying a book and then realise you have 10 all which have the same recipes in them already – this is certainly not one of those books.

It took me some time to decide what I was going to make.  Eventually the decision was made, A Rogan Josh (Mr K asked for something spicy), a Poussin Penda and more unsually, and because I currently have a glut of eggs, Aloo Dimer Jhol, an egg curry with potatoes.  I have to say, I have never used eggs in a curry and did follow the recipe to the letter as I was concerned the eggs would fall apart and it would all turn to mush but no, it was amazing.  In fact all of them were delicious.  Mr K loves Indian food but I can have a slightly heavy hand when tipping chillies into a dish, and occasionally he has a look of fear once the heats comes through, only occasionally you understand.  He tells me that although these were hot, they were not ‘blow you head off’ hot, which is a compliment, honestly.  The heat dissipated quickly and you were just left with the full flavour.  I did tell him to drink a Lassi with it but he looked oddly at me and said he would be just fine with beer.  I can only apologise for the photos – by the time I took this it was quite late and we were very hungry – oh, and I might have had a couple of glasses of wine 😉

So the first dish I will tell you about is the Poussin Penda – I will post the others over the next couple of days and hopefully in time for you to give them all a go for an Indian Feast at the weekend.

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Poussin Penda – serves 4 as part of meal – syns per serving 0 (syn if you eat the skin though)

  • 1 Poussin, cut into 4 pieces
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 5 tomatoes, pureed
  • 1 1/2 tsp chilli powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1 tsp salt

Heat pan and spray with some frylight, add the onion, garlic and cinnamon and cook until the onion is browned.

Add Poussin pieces and fry until skin is lightly browned, then add pureed tomatoes, chilli powder, coriander, turmeric, cumin, garam masala and salt and mix well.

Stir in 1 litre of water, cover and cook poussin on medium heat for about 20 minutes.

After this time, check chicken is cooked through and remove from the sauce, check if sauce is thick enough, if not, reduce down until it is the required consistency, if too thick, add some more water – this is personal taste.  It is THAT easy!

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More Curry Joy!

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I told you I like a good curry and I have to say that there are loads of Slimming World curries that are fantastic. However, I’m a bit of a curry fanatic and the fact that I have about 50 curry recipe books that I would abandon brings me out in a bit of a sweat. We have a fabulous curry house here in Cambridge that one of our group members booked for our Slimming World Christmas Meal – I know, you would think that if you were following SW the last thing you would do is go out for a curry but she had a long chat with them as she had a meal there virtually every week and they adapted dishes for her – they even used Frylight. Now I know that if I mentioned that at my nearest curry house they would probably throw a Naan bread and tikka skewer at me – literally. Anyway, the meal was amazing, prawns, chicken and lamb curries with sauces, fruit salads – it was fantastic. And if my mind serves me correctly I still lost a pound that week.

I’ve been to The Seafood Restaurant in Padstow lots of times over the year’s – it’s win win, fabulous rooms, the sea, great walks and great food – what more can you want and it’s our treat. The thought of a fish curry revolted me until I had my first one there, which was possibly a monkfish curry, but don’t quote me on that, every time I go I have to have a curry, they are always properly spicy and deliciously fresh – and the Singapore crab was a terribly messy, very lengthy affair but I loved every second of it – I am not a woman easily phased if presented with a whole crab, it’s cutlery down and tucked napkin down neck of whatever I’m wearing – not in a greedy way, it’s just the way it should be! The curry I am showing you is from Rick Stein’s ‘India’ and was delicious – it’s the red one at the top of the picture (the chicken one was also delicious but I will tell you about another day) – the perfect heat, the fish wasn’t overpowered by the sauce. Just YUM!  I had to adapt a couple of minor things because it was what I had in the kitchen.

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Madras Fish Curry with tomato and tamarind – serves 4 just with rice -less than 1/2 syn per portion

  • 1 tbsp yellow mustard seeds (I used black mustard seeds)
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely crushed
  • 30 fresh curry leaves
  • 2 tsp chilli powder
  • 2 tsp ground coriander
  • 2 tsp turmeric
  • 400g can chopped tomatoes
  • 1 tsp tamarind paste diluted in 100ml water
  • 2 green chillies, sliced into 6 pieces lengthways (I used 2 red chillies)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 700g fish fillets, cut into chunks – I used Gurnard

Heat some frylight in a pan and fry mustard seeds for around 30 seconds, stir in onion and garlic and fry gently for around 10 minutes until soft and lightly golden.  Add curry leaves, chilli powder, coriander and turmeric and fry for 2 minutes, then stir in the tomatoes, tamarind liquid, chillies and salt and simmer for 10 more minutes until rich and reduced.  Add fish and cook for further 5 minutes or until cooked through and serve with rice.

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