Twisted Kedgeree

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What a whole bunch of faffing around – I have had issues with positing these photos as there was a WordPress something or other technical going on.  Consequently I kept abandoning this post, huffing, laptop being unceremoniously abandoned on a sofa or coffee table.  Every time I looked at it it was calling me ‘finish this post’ go on, do it’, to no avail.  In the end I had to resort to getting my ‘expert’ to sort it out, so thanks Mr K.

So to my Kedgeree, I would eat it morning, noon and night if I could but the only issue I have ever had is that you can’t really reheat it as the rice dries out a bit too much for me.  And knowing that I can only cook for about a dozen this doesn’t really work in my world.

I thought everyone knew how to make kedgeree but apparently not, several people have asked me what it is when I’m discussing my boring breakfast.  I do love breakfast but my issue is that I just don’t have time and my waistline can’t stand what I actually want,  fresh, hot buttered toast or a lovely bacon sandwich, but alas, normally fruit and yoghurt washed down with plenty of coffee is as exciting as it gets.  I realised after the word kedgeree came up for about the tenth time it could no longer be ignored and I would just have it for dinner instead.  Kedgeree is an Anglo-Indian mash up and the smoked haddock and eggs were added when it was brought over in Colonial times.  I thought why not make a kedgeree with risotto rice instead of plain boiled rice.  After having a look around there are others who do this too so here is such a beautiful dish that you can have at any time of day, I made enough that I got to reheat it for breakfast which is when it is traditionally eaten and it didn’t dry out at all.

I do have to say that I put a little too much fennel in it though so make sure you put the amount I list below and not the quantity I have put in the picture, oops!  And another thing, I can only apologise for the fact that the haddock is dyed – it drives me mad when I can’t find natural dyed smoked haddock but unfortunately the people of the UK apparently still demand this so it’s what there was I’m afraid.

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Twisted Kedgeree – Serves as many as you like – syn free on Slimming World

  • Smoked Haddock
  • 1 large shallot, chopped
  • Risotto rice
  • Fish stock
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds
  • 1/4 tsp chilli powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1 lemon
  • Parsley
  • 3 eggs, hard boiled

Dry fry cumin and fennel seeds until they release their scent, then add turmeric, chilli powder and salt, then grind in pestle and mortar.

Fry off shallot in fry light, add risotto rice and ground spices and gradually add hot stock until all absorbed (follow general instructions here on cooking risotto)

Whilst cooking risotto, boil eggs for 7 minutes, peel and cut into quarters when slightly cooled.

Remove skin, cut fish into pieces and add this to risotto rice about 5 minutes before risotto is cooked.

When risotto and haddock is cooked add the garam masala, eggs and lemon juice to taste and a little extra stock if you need to loosen it up.

Add parsley, stir through and serve as much as you like.

Reheat the next morning for breakfast.

A Trip Along the Grand Trunk Road – Part 3 Aloo Dimer Jhol

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This is the final part of this curry feast and I hope you agree that all of the dishes can stand up to being served either on their own or as part of a varied feast. I was somewhat outside of my comfort zone with this one, although I love eggs I have never used them as the main ingredient in a curry but I think it was a triumph and would urge you to give this one a go.

I yet again have to apologise for the presentation and photography – late Saturday night and I might have had a glass of wine which means I become a little less careful (in fact, it sort of gets thrown at the table at that stage) ‘hangs head in shame’.

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Aloo Dimer Jhol – serves 2 – syn free

  • 4 small potatoes
  • 4 hard boiled eggs
  • 1 large garlic clove
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3 tomatoes, roughly chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 cardamom pods
  • 2 cloves
  • 1 inch piece ginger
  • 1 large green chilli
  • 1/2 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp chilli powder
  • salt
  • 1 tbsp fresh coriander

Slice potatoes lengthways.  Spray pan with frylight and shallow fry potatoes over a low heat until cooked through.  Set these aside and fry eggs, whole, for 2-3 minutes and set aside.

Put garlic, chopped onions and tomatoes in blender and puree.  Set aside.

To the empty pan add bay leaf, cinnamon stick, cardamom pods and cloves and cook for a couple of minutes.  Add the tomato and onion puree, cover and cook on a medium heat for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add the turmeric, cumin, chilli powder and salt.  Add 250ml water and simmer for about another 10 minutes until this has thickened.  Add the potatoes and eggs and cook for a further 5 minutes.  Serve sprinkled with fresh chopped coriander.